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Here’s What Critics are Saying About the “Heartbreaking” Lil Peep Documentary

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Lil Peep close-up 'Everybody's Everything'

Everybody’s Everything, the highly anticipated documentary examining the tragically short life of Gustav “Lil Peep” Åhr arrives in theatres November 15.

The release comes a year after his first posthumous album, Come Over When You’re Sober, Pt. 2, and two years on from his accidental death by drug overdose. In the intervening years since his death his fans, friends and family have attempted to make sense of his death.

In this authorized documentary directors Sebastian Jones and Ramez Silyan call on Lil Peep’s peers including iLoveMakonnen, Trapzilla, Juicy J, Ghostmane, JGRXXN, Smokeasac, and Sus Boy to shed light on the nexus of SoundCloud Rap and emo confessionalism from which he produced. In this way, Everybody’s Everything is both a helpful document of Peep as a musician and a young person, and of the genre he embodied.

But it’s the moving recollections of his friends, family, and specifically his grandfather– leftist historian, Jack Womack– that offers the most nuanced, complex and moving observations of the late star.

Read what critics are saying about the documentary below.

“The juxtaposition between Peep at home as a kid, and a not-much-older Peep cast out in front of the world, is both fascinating and heartbreaking.”


Dan Caffrey, Consequence of Sound

“Everybody’s Everything offers a guided history of his life, times, and music through the lens of the media that Peep leveraged. It’s a film full of highs and lows, sorrow and recollection, fun and political ideology–a mess, but one that feels authentic and accurate.”


John Fink, The Film Stage

“It’s a cautionary, melancholic tale of the incessant demand de rigueur of 24/7/365 internet celebrity.”


Marc Savlov, Austin Chronicle

“Everybody’s Everything is truly sad, due to the tragic circumstances at the center of the story, but also poignant and made with the utmost of love.”


Ryan Oliver, The Playlist

“The saving grace of Everybody’s Everything are intermittent voiceovers of letters written by Åhr’s grandfather, and ostensible lifelong father figure, Jack Womack. He felt for Peep. He did not judge Peep. And, through his words, the audience gets a sense of care and stability—maybe the only permanently stable figure Åhr had ever known.”


Nick Remsen, W Magazine

“Everybody’s Everything is at its best when it wears that auteur’s influence on its sleeve. Of all the film’s many conflicting strategies, the most effective is the sporadic, Malickian use of voiceover narration.”


David Ehrlich indieWire

“Peep’s grandfather Womack, previously only heard in voiceover, is allowed to speak at length. Unfazed by all the face tattoos and calculated outrageousness that accompanied his grandson’s artistic persona, Womack clearly never stopped seeing Peep as his little boy, and his quiet ruminations on mortality and manhood land with shattering force.”


Andrew Barker, Variety

 

“This isn’t a document of judgment or blame. It’s a family’s meditation on grief and loss; it starts with chaos and ends with calm.”


Audra Schroeder, The Daily Dot

 

And in the end, arrives at some kind of truth

“Everybody’s Everything arrives at some kind of truth about the risks and rewards of an artist with seemingly no boundaries, personal or otherwise.”


Emily Yoshida, Vulture

Everybody’s Everything lands in theaters November 15.

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